MariaCarmi

"With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams... it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy"

26,207 notes

yainterrobang:

LIST OF THE WEEK: TWENTY BANNED BOOKS
Celebrate your intellectual freedom. Read a banned book.

Learn more about each book here: The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, Looking for Alaska, I Hunt Killers, Eleanor & Park, Gossip Girl, The Hunger Games, TTYL, 13 Reasons Why, The Giver, Speak, Hold Still, Whale Talk, The Miseducation of Cameron Post, Twenty Boy Summer, Boy Meets Boy, Living Dead Girl, Fallen Angels, Vampire Academy, The Supernaturalist, A Wrinkle In Time.

For more fun lists and all things YA lit, visit our website, follow us here and on Twitter, and subscribe to our weekly newsletter!

(via marissamariec)

199,139 notes

generic-art:

5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 

Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.

Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.

“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

Much better version of the same subject matter I posted earlier.

(via effys)

47,069 notes

homophobed:

unwomanlythoughts:

microaggressions:

When a financial institution asks me my “mother’s maiden name” as a security question. Because it’s assumed that I have at least one and no more than one mother in my life AND that she married AND that she gave up her own name AND that that part of her identity was erased enough from my public history so as to be a password to access my private information.

Holy crap, I never realized.

chill

(via chschwie)